Marchesa RTW Fall 2015 delivers…“Opium Dreams”

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Allow me to admit i am a fan of Marchesa, as  Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig never seemed to disappoint me in the past,so much more now that they chose elaborate,chic decadence right out of Thomas De Quincey’s  pages ”Confession of an English Opium Eater”,with the same extend of indulging fantasy. Only here,instead of laudanum,there were elaborate embellishes,dresses with strategically cut  bare sides and strong thirties references .This was more of a Baudelaire bordello chic than Hollywood black-tie event,till, if there was a way for me to embrace ”princess gowns”, well that was the collection i needed!

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”Death Becomes..Him”-Thom Browne Fall 2015 Ready-to-Wear

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Thom Browne’s Fall 2015 Ready-to-Wear collection was a study in mourning attire,therefore a study in black,  probably inspired by the ”Death Becomes Her” exhibition currently on display at Metropolitan Museum.Or, a study in mourning as an attitude,a collection bearing an almost ”Freudian” obsession to loss,emphasized by strong,all black silhouettes that looked  interestingly modern.There is something ultra classy in this ”twisted” pieces,something that surpasses ”revival” and goes back to the ”roots” of fashion per se.The styling was much elaborate yet it was easy to see that each garment, so carefully produced, could make a statement piece of its own.Yes,this was a collection full of statement pieces and at the same time a clever exploration of mourning attire,set in a performance that brought in mind some cult black-and -white films (see Dreyer dramas)  as well as near death experiences-aka the perfect setting.

”Spooky”-Tim Walker collaborates with Agyness Deyn for LOVE magazine S/S 2015

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Katie Grand-Fashion Editor
Agyness Deyn-Talent
Jordan Hill, Liam Duffy, Reece Winchester, Sylvester Ulv, Tobias Ellehammer-Male Models and Dancers
Julien d’Ys-Head & Body Paint, Headpieces
Emma Roach-Set Designer
Jeff Delich-Production

Nick Knight’s archives celebrate ”Unseen McQueen” via Showstudio, from 13 to 20 March

 

”Give me time and I will give you a revolution”

~Alexander McQueen~

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In conjunction with the opening of ‘Savage Beauty’ at the V&A on 14 March 2015, SHOWstudio celebrates the life of the late Lee McQueen and his fruitful bond with Nick Knight. Knight has filmed all of his photoshoots since the late eighties and, for the first time, reveals hidden gems from his archive to the public. One piece of unseen McQueen footage will be revealed each day from 13 to 20 March.

SHOWstudio founder and acclaimed image-maker Nick Knight has filmed all of his photoshoots since the late eighties. In his extensive personal archive sits footage of some of his most iconic shoots – from Dior campaigns with John Galliano to pioneering editorials for the likes of Visionaire and Vogue. In a very special initiative, Knight will reveal a run of previously unseen gems from this extensive archive to the public as a means of celebrating his longterm working relationship with the late Lee McQueen. The SHOWstudio team and Knight’s photographic assistants have spent months searching through endless tapes and days of footage, digitalising early work and editing their finds into beautiful films.

Launching in conjunction with the opening of Savage Beauty at the V&A, London on 14 March 2015, SHOWstudio’s Unseen McQueen series will celebrate the life and work of the late designer by revealing previously unreleased interviews and behind-the-scenes footage from some of his most iconic projects. Knight’s relationship with McQueen, who passed away in February 2010, began formally in 1996, when the two collaborated on a series of images for the Florence Biennale, though the pair had met previously at events and McQueen had begun to send Knight an annual Christmas fax. For Spring/Summer 2010, SHOWstudio famously live-streamed Plato’s Atlanis, McQueen’s final collection before his death.

Footage to be released as part of Unseen McQueen includes a candid interview with McQueen, filmed at the early stages of his career in 1997, footage of Knight shooting McQueen for the April 1998 cover of The Face- a now iconic image – and a video of Knight, Katy England, Michael Clark and McQueen collaborating on the unforgettable Blade of Light image featuring clothing from the They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? collection from Spring/Summer 2004.

One piece of unseen footage will be revealed each day from 13 – 20 March 2015. To explain and unpick the footage, SHOWstudio editor Lou Stoppard will interview Knight about each new release, shedding light on their working relationship, McQueen as a man and the vision and ideas behind their collaborations. Theory and analysis on themes pertaining to McQueen’s life and legacy – from his love of spectacle and commitment to pushing the boundaries of fashion presentation to the nature of the fashion exhibition – will also be offered through interviews with those who worked with McQueen and experts who have studied his work.

”Elaborate Embroidery- Fabrics for Menswear before 1815” exhibition at the MET

Embroidery sample for a man's suit, 1800–1815. French. Silk embroidery on silk velvet; L. 13 1/4 x W. 11 1/8 in. (33.7 x 28.3 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

Embroidery sample for a man’s suit, 1800–1815. French. Silk embroidery on silk velvet; L. 13 1/4 x W. 11 1/8 in. (33.7 x 28.3 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,

This installation features lengths of fabric for an unmade man’s suit and waistcoat, as well as a selection of embroidery samples for fashionable menswear made between about 1760 and 1815.

During this period, France was the undisputed epicenter of the European fashionable world, and professional embroidery workshops there produced a dizzying array of colorful designs from which a man could choose. The installation features a copy of L’Art du Brodeur (The Art of the Embroiderer), which was published in Paris in 1770. This book contains detailed descriptions about subjects such as preparing fabric to be embroidered and the variety of threads used in a workshop, as well as illustrations of designs for men’s suits.

Seen together, the fabrics and the book provide a glimpse into the world of vividly colored and highly decorative fashion that was a key component of an upper-class European man’s life in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

(February 2–July 19, 2015)

‘Paint Your Dream’ by Jamie Nelson with Anna Sokolova & Liz Kennedy

 

”Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?”

~Edgar Allan Poe~

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(PHOTOGRAPHER: JAMIE NELSON. MODEL(S): ANNA SOKOLOVA, LIZ KENNEDY. STYLIST: LISA JARVIS.MAKEUP: YUKI HAYASHI. HAIR: KUNIO KOHZAKI)

“Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire”-The Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition

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‘Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire”, The Costume Institute’s first fall exhibition in seven years, is on view in The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Anna Wintour Costume Center from October 21, 2014, through February 1, 2015. The exhibition explores the aesthetic development and cultural implications of mourning fashions of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Approximately 30 ensembles, many of which are being exhibited for the first time, reveal the impact of high-fashion standards on the sartorial dictates of bereavement rituals as they evolved over a century.

With the reopening of The Costume Institute space in May as the Anna Wintour Costume Center, the department returns to mounting two special exhibitions a year, once again including a fall show, in addition to the major spring exhibition. This is the first fall exhibition The Costume Institute has organized since addressing fashion in 2007.

“The predominantly black palette of mourning dramatizes the evolution of period silhouettes and the increasing absorption of fashion ideals into this most codified of etiquettes,” said Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, who is curating the exhibition with Jessica Regan, Assistant Curator. “The veiled widow could elicit sympathy as well as predatory male advances. As a woman of sexual experience without marital constraints, she was often imagined as a potential threat to the social order.”

The thematic exhibition is organized chronologically and features mourning dress from 1815 to 1915, primarily from The Costume Institute’s collection. The calendar of bereavement’s evolution and cultural implications are illuminated through women’s clothing and accessories, showing the progression of appropriate fabrics from mourning crape to corded silks, and the later introduction of color with shades of gray and mauve.

“Elaborate standards of mourning set by royalty spread across class lines via fashion magazines,” said Ms. Regan, “and the prescribed clothing was readily available for purchase through mourning ‘warehouses’ that proliferated in European and American cities by mid-century.”

The Anna Wintour Costume Center’s Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery orients visitors to the exhibition with fashion plates, jewelry, and accessories. The main Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery illustrates the evolution of mourning wear through high fashion silhouettes and includes mourning gowns worn by Queen Victoria and Queen Alexandra. Examples of restrained simplicity are shown alongside those with ostentatious ornamentation. The predominantly black clothes are set off within a stark white space amplified with historic photographs and daguerreotypes.

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