Yohji Yamamoto RTW Spring 2016

Paris 2016 RTW Fashion Week-”Black is the new Black!”See the most iconic black dresses of the season!

“I love black because it affirms, designs and styles. A woman in a black dress is a pencil stroke.”

~Yves Saint Laurent~

Yohji Yamamoto RTW Spring 2016

Yohji Yamamoto RTW Spring 2016

”Black is modest and arrogant at the same time. Black is lazy and easy — but mysterious. But above all black says this: I don’t bother you — don’t bother me.”

~Yohji Yamamoto~


Comme des Garçons SPRING 2016 READY-TO-WEAR

SPRING 2016 READY-TO-WEAR vetements





Isabel Marant SPRING 2016 READY-TO-WEAR

Junya Watanabe RTW Spring 2016

Chalayan RTW Spring 2016

Chalayan RTW Spring 2016

”Fashioning the Body: An Intimate History of the Silhouette” exhibition at Bard Graduate Center Gallery

halebone stays. France, ca. 1740–6. Photo: Patricia Canino/ Courtesy of The Bard Graduate Center

halebone stays. France, ca. 1740–6. Photo: Patricia Canino/ Courtesy of The Bard Graduate Center

”Fashioning the Body: An Intimate History of the Silhouette” examines the extraordinary ways in which women and men have shaped their bodies into distinctive silhouettes in the name of fashion.Having garnered high acclaim at the Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris in 2013, the exhibition Fashioning the Body will present the many devices and materials that women and men have used to shape their silhouettes from the seventeenth century to today, including panniers, corsets, crinolines, bustles, stomach belts, girdles, and push-up brassieres, alongside examples of period garments that were molded by these distinctive understructures.  The exhibition will also look at how lacing, hinges, straps, springs, and stretch fabrics have been used to alter natural body forms.Curated by Dr. Denis Bruna, curator, Fashion and Textile department, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, and professor at the École du Louvre.

Through July 26, 2015


Bustle known as a “strapontin.” France, 1887. (Photo: Patricia Canino/ Courtesy of The Bard Graduate Center)


Corset. United States, ca. 1860-70. (Photo: Patricia Canino/ Courtesy of The Bard Graduate Center)

The Evolution of Haute Couture-Jeffrey Felner,Monsieur X and Maria Aristidou discuss the future of Haute Couture

1951. Christian Dior. Silk taffeta evening gown w/ jewel @ bust worn with opera length evening gloves. Paris

1951. Christian Dior. Silk taffeta evening gown w/ jewel @ bust worn with opera length evening gloves. Paris

Haute Couture has always been,by definition, a matter of exquisite design,excellent stitching and taking care of individual clients’needs.’Haute Couture’ is also a term that enjoys protection of the French Law,since the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Paris determine which fashion houses are eligible to be ‘ haute couture houses’,with this privilege being strictly protected by the Chambre Syndicale.Generally,we find that in order for an atelier to use the term ‘couture’,there must be : ” a couture fashion house that creates unique pieces designed to directly fit on a client’s body or on a dress form replicating hers, with a number of individual fittings being carried out on each client. They must have an atelier in Paris, with at least 20 full time employees, and the fashion house must present a minimum of two 25–piece collections to the Paris press each year.”

Impressive.But,in the era of fashion shows’ live transmission via web and with trends being originating through Instagram “influencers” and pop culture,is there place for Haute Couture to serve its elitist purpose?There is,we think.Karl Lagerfeld describes this evolution as a matter of just changing times:“There is now a different kind of couture for what different circumstances permit. Luxury ready-to-wear is not so far from what couture used to be … The new couture clients are beautiful, young. We have Russians, Indians, Chinese, South Americans. Women from the Gulf countries don’t even come to Paris; the première flies the collections to them.”Can that be Haute Couture? We asked three friends ( and mostly)fashion insiders for their view over this interesting yet critical issue-the future of Haute Couture.

Jeffrey Felner:

”As long as there are those of extreme wealth there will always be Haute Couture. The question is what will Haute Couture look like in generations to come and who will be responsible for carrying the torch. IMHO the future is not in the hands of a Raf but in the hands of Vauthier, Lemaire, Saab and Valli as it they who understand and remain committed to the tenets and practices of the craft.”

 (JF is the international fashion editor for the examiner.com as well as a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books with the focus being on all aspects of fashion and style.)


Monsieur X:

”Some brands like JP Gautier stop ready-to-wear to focus on haute couture only, which appears to be much more profitable.Although Haute Couture is not always lucrative, it offers a few brands a worldwide recognition and becomes attractive to Middle East, Russian and emerging market countries clientele.Thanks to these new customers, young brands newly labelled as haute couture brands, start becoming profitable.Today, fashion houses move to the most important capital cities in the world, in order to establish closer ties with their customers.Haute couture goes on evolving with a new generation of designers and keep on attracting journalists and bloggers. It definitly needs to go on seducing this clientele to continue and make people dream.”

(Monsieur X

(.Monsieur X’s goal is to make discover or rediscover forgotten or badly represented artists.Specialized in the world of Luxury and Fashion, Monsieur X has collaborated with the following brands Dior Fine Jewellery, Chanel Fine Jewellery, Cartier, Boucheron, Chaumet, Kenzo, Céline,  Fendi, Balmain and also the young talented designer Alexis Mabille.)


Maria Aristidou:

”Nowadays, even though financial crisis forced many Haute Couture designers to either close down their ateriers or make a 360o diversion to Ready to Wear, I still believe that Haute Couture is surviving.  Maybe on a smaller scale but definatley it is not vanishing.  Yes, Haute Couture is that special creation, the unique piece that is designed for a client’s figure with a special care, hand made, hand embroideries, etc…but that is its whole beauty and magic!!!.I still believe that there is a demand for it even worldwide economy goes through tough times.”

(Fashion designer in both men and women wear. http://www.mariaristidou.com Her last project was a Limited Edition Scarf Line A/W 2014-15. She is now working on her next capsule collections as well as for the collaboration with LIVE AID Symphony Orchestra at the at the SGM Conference Center Roma for a charity fashion show in 2016.)