Marchesa RTW Fall 2015 delivers…“Opium Dreams”

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Allow me to admit i am a fan of Marchesa, as  Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig never seemed to disappoint me in the past,so much more now that they chose elaborate,chic decadence right out of Thomas De Quincey’s  pages ”Confession of an English Opium Eater”,with the same extend of indulging fantasy. Only here,instead of laudanum,there were elaborate embellishes,dresses with strategically cut  bare sides and strong thirties references .This was more of a Baudelaire bordello chic than Hollywood black-tie event,till, if there was a way for me to embrace ”princess gowns”, well that was the collection i needed!

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”Death Becomes..Him”-Thom Browne Fall 2015 Ready-to-Wear

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Thom Browne’s Fall 2015 Ready-to-Wear collection was a study in mourning attire,therefore a study in black,  probably inspired by the ”Death Becomes Her” exhibition currently on display at Metropolitan Museum.Or, a study in mourning as an attitude,a collection bearing an almost ”Freudian” obsession to loss,emphasized by strong,all black silhouettes that looked  interestingly modern.There is something ultra classy in this ”twisted” pieces,something that surpasses ”revival” and goes back to the ”roots” of fashion per se.The styling was much elaborate yet it was easy to see that each garment, so carefully produced, could make a statement piece of its own.Yes,this was a collection full of statement pieces and at the same time a clever exploration of mourning attire,set in a performance that brought in mind some cult black-and -white films (see Dreyer dramas)  as well as near death experiences-aka the perfect setting.

The Evolution of Haute Couture-Jeffrey Felner,Monsieur X and Maria Aristidou discuss the future of Haute Couture

1951. Christian Dior. Silk taffeta evening gown w/ jewel @ bust worn with opera length evening gloves. Paris

1951. Christian Dior. Silk taffeta evening gown w/ jewel @ bust worn with opera length evening gloves. Paris

Haute Couture has always been,by definition, a matter of exquisite design,excellent stitching and taking care of individual clients’needs.’Haute Couture’ is also a term that enjoys protection of the French Law,since the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Paris determine which fashion houses are eligible to be ‘ haute couture houses’,with this privilege being strictly protected by the Chambre Syndicale.Generally,we find that in order for an atelier to use the term ‘couture’,there must be : ” a couture fashion house that creates unique pieces designed to directly fit on a client’s body or on a dress form replicating hers, with a number of individual fittings being carried out on each client. They must have an atelier in Paris, with at least 20 full time employees, and the fashion house must present a minimum of two 25–piece collections to the Paris press each year.”

Impressive.But,in the era of fashion shows’ live transmission via web and with trends being originating through Instagram “influencers” and pop culture,is there place for Haute Couture to serve its elitist purpose?There is,we think.Karl Lagerfeld describes this evolution as a matter of just changing times:“There is now a different kind of couture for what different circumstances permit. Luxury ready-to-wear is not so far from what couture used to be … The new couture clients are beautiful, young. We have Russians, Indians, Chinese, South Americans. Women from the Gulf countries don’t even come to Paris; the première flies the collections to them.”Can that be Haute Couture? We asked three friends ( and mostly)fashion insiders for their view over this interesting yet critical issue-the future of Haute Couture.

Jeffrey Felner:

”As long as there are those of extreme wealth there will always be Haute Couture. The question is what will Haute Couture look like in generations to come and who will be responsible for carrying the torch. IMHO the future is not in the hands of a Raf but in the hands of Vauthier, Lemaire, Saab and Valli as it they who understand and remain committed to the tenets and practices of the craft.”

 (JF is the international fashion editor for the examiner.com as well as a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books with the focus being on all aspects of fashion and style.)

 

Monsieur X:

”Some brands like JP Gautier stop ready-to-wear to focus on haute couture only, which appears to be much more profitable.Although Haute Couture is not always lucrative, it offers a few brands a worldwide recognition and becomes attractive to Middle East, Russian and emerging market countries clientele.Thanks to these new customers, young brands newly labelled as haute couture brands, start becoming profitable.Today, fashion houses move to the most important capital cities in the world, in order to establish closer ties with their customers.Haute couture goes on evolving with a new generation of designers and keep on attracting journalists and bloggers. It definitly needs to go on seducing this clientele to continue and make people dream.”

(Monsieur X

(.Monsieur X’s goal is to make discover or rediscover forgotten or badly represented artists.Specialized in the world of Luxury and Fashion, Monsieur X has collaborated with the following brands Dior Fine Jewellery, Chanel Fine Jewellery, Cartier, Boucheron, Chaumet, Kenzo, Céline,  Fendi, Balmain and also the young talented designer Alexis Mabille.)

 

Maria Aristidou:

”Nowadays, even though financial crisis forced many Haute Couture designers to either close down their ateriers or make a 360o diversion to Ready to Wear, I still believe that Haute Couture is surviving.  Maybe on a smaller scale but definatley it is not vanishing.  Yes, Haute Couture is that special creation, the unique piece that is designed for a client’s figure with a special care, hand made, hand embroideries, etc…but that is its whole beauty and magic!!!.I still believe that there is a demand for it even worldwide economy goes through tough times.”

(Fashion designer in both men and women wear. http://www.mariaristidou.com Her last project was a Limited Edition Scarf Line A/W 2014-15. She is now working on her next capsule collections as well as for the collaboration with LIVE AID Symphony Orchestra at the at the SGM Conference Center Roma for a charity fashion show in 2016.)

 

 

”Spooky”-Tim Walker collaborates with Agyness Deyn for LOVE magazine S/S 2015

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Katie Grand-Fashion Editor
Agyness Deyn-Talent
Jordan Hill, Liam Duffy, Reece Winchester, Sylvester Ulv, Tobias Ellehammer-Male Models and Dancers
Julien d’Ys-Head & Body Paint, Headpieces
Emma Roach-Set Designer
Jeff Delich-Production

Pepe Jeans London Spring Summer 2015 ad campaign lensed by Mario Sorrenti

Pepe Jeans London Spring Summer 2015 ad campaign lensed by Mario Sorrenti and starring Cara Delevingne,

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FIFTY SHADES OF GREY: STARS DAKOTA JOHNSON AND JAMIE DORNAN lensed by Steven Pan for GLAMOUR magazine

FIFTY SHADES OF GREY: STARS DAKOTA JOHNSON AND JAMIE DORNAN photographed by Steven Pan for GLAMOUR

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Nick Knight’s archives celebrate ”Unseen McQueen” via Showstudio, from 13 to 20 March

 

”Give me time and I will give you a revolution”

~Alexander McQueen~

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In conjunction with the opening of ‘Savage Beauty’ at the V&A on 14 March 2015, SHOWstudio celebrates the life of the late Lee McQueen and his fruitful bond with Nick Knight. Knight has filmed all of his photoshoots since the late eighties and, for the first time, reveals hidden gems from his archive to the public. One piece of unseen McQueen footage will be revealed each day from 13 to 20 March.

SHOWstudio founder and acclaimed image-maker Nick Knight has filmed all of his photoshoots since the late eighties. In his extensive personal archive sits footage of some of his most iconic shoots – from Dior campaigns with John Galliano to pioneering editorials for the likes of Visionaire and Vogue. In a very special initiative, Knight will reveal a run of previously unseen gems from this extensive archive to the public as a means of celebrating his longterm working relationship with the late Lee McQueen. The SHOWstudio team and Knight’s photographic assistants have spent months searching through endless tapes and days of footage, digitalising early work and editing their finds into beautiful films.

Launching in conjunction with the opening of Savage Beauty at the V&A, London on 14 March 2015, SHOWstudio’s Unseen McQueen series will celebrate the life and work of the late designer by revealing previously unreleased interviews and behind-the-scenes footage from some of his most iconic projects. Knight’s relationship with McQueen, who passed away in February 2010, began formally in 1996, when the two collaborated on a series of images for the Florence Biennale, though the pair had met previously at events and McQueen had begun to send Knight an annual Christmas fax. For Spring/Summer 2010, SHOWstudio famously live-streamed Plato’s Atlanis, McQueen’s final collection before his death.

Footage to be released as part of Unseen McQueen includes a candid interview with McQueen, filmed at the early stages of his career in 1997, footage of Knight shooting McQueen for the April 1998 cover of The Face– a now iconic image – and a video of Knight, Katy England, Michael Clark and McQueen collaborating on the unforgettable Blade of Light image featuring clothing from the They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? collection from Spring/Summer 2004.

One piece of unseen footage will be revealed each day from 13 – 20 March 2015. To explain and unpick the footage, SHOWstudio editor Lou Stoppard will interview Knight about each new release, shedding light on their working relationship, McQueen as a man and the vision and ideas behind their collaborations. Theory and analysis on themes pertaining to McQueen’s life and legacy – from his love of spectacle and commitment to pushing the boundaries of fashion presentation to the nature of the fashion exhibition – will also be offered through interviews with those who worked with McQueen and experts who have studied his work.